Merino Wool Facts 1-4 | rotauf.ch
Purchase on invoice
Free Shipping & Exchange
Delivery in 2 Working Days

ROTAUF Blog

Stay tuned with us and follow our stories

Merino Wool Facts 1-4

The production of merino wool is a sensitive issue. That is why we want to address problems and show solutions. We know that merino wool can be produced in harmony with nature and animals. We do that together with our partner Schoeller Spinning Group from Lake Constance.

Merino Fact 1

FACT (BAD NEWS)

Merino sheep are attacked by flies that lay their eggs in the sheep's skin folds. Larvae hatch from this and feed on the meat of the sheep. The infected meat is often cut off the sheep without stunning. This practice is called mulesing.

Merino Fact 1

FACT (GOOD NEWS)

ROTAUF sources its merino wool from Schoeller Wool. Schoeller is the only spinning mill that only purchases mulesing-free merino wool. So there can be no mix-up during the processing of the merino wool into yarn.

Merino Fact 2

FACT (BAD NEWS)

If there is no mulesing, an infestation of the flies must be prevented. This is achieved by bathing sheep in insecticides. This kills the flies that would otherwise infest the sheep.

Merino Fact 2

FACT (GOOD NEWS)

ROTAUF obtains merino wool exclusively from controlled organic animal husbandry. In this standard, insecticide baths and of course mulesing are prohibited.

Merino Fact 3

FACT (BAD NEWS)

Merino sheep are shorn every 10 months on average, then the wool quality is best. That is why some of the sheep are sheared in winter. In this case they have to go to the stable to protect them from the cold. Often, however, the sheep don't have enough space here.

Merino Fact 3

FACT (GOOD NEWS)

Sheep from controlled organic animal husbandry get enough straw to lie on in winter and must have enough space. ROTAUF only purchases merino wool from controlled organic animal husbandry.

Merino Fact 4

FACT (BAD NEWS)

There are over 20 different breeds of merino sheep. High-performance breeds that produce a lot of good wool are particularly popular. These merino sheep mostly require an increased supply of nutrients in the form of concentrated feed, which often consists of genetically modified plants.

Merino Fact 4

FACT (GOOD NEWS)

In the controlled organic animal husbandry, robust breeds are kept above all, which get by without concentrated feed. If the sheep have to be fed in the barn in winter, organic sheep are only given feed without genetically modified plants.

Sharing posts: